Puttin' on Blackface for the Shanghailanders at the Canidrome Ballroom (1930)

While Teddy Weatherford was extremely skilled in the art of modern jazz piano, he was often called upon to put on blackface (metaphorically) and perform pieces that Shanghailanders and other colonial elites associated with African American culture. Here is one instance, where Teddy and other "negro" artists in the Canidrome ballroom band put together a quartet to sing spirituals (notice how many times the word "negro" comes up in this piece). These sorts of performances were also popular when Teddy moved to India in his later years. Note also the presence of Russian artists among the various performances at the Canidrome.

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"The Greatest Jazz Aggregation Ever to Appear in the Orient" (1929)

This article is interesting for many reasons. It recounts the formation of the first jazz band to play at the famed Canidrome Ballroom in Shanghai. It mentions that the band played at the coronation of the Japanese Emperor (Hirohito)--something that I need to do further research on, but if that's the case, that is fascinating! It also mentions that the band made some recordings in Japan (also something to follow up on). Above all, it continues telling the story of Teddy Weatherford, Asia's great jazz ambassador, filling in some gaps in his record.

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Closing Down the Carlton Cafe with a Big Shindig (1928)

The new Carlton Cafe was years ahead of its time according to Whitey Smith who writes about it in his memoir I Didn’t Make a Million. Located on Bubbling Well Road where the Grand Theater stands today, it boasted a huge ballroom and dining hall. This article in the China Press captures the final days of the Carlton before it went under. Jack Carter and Lavada Snow and dancer Bo-Diddly are the stars of the show.

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